June 17, 2014

bankuei:

everything-creative:

A great idea to connect the future with the past, seal your digital secrets with an old-school wax-sealing. The Top secret usb.

Man.  I’m totally envisioning a Chinese sci-fi movie where the Emperor’s Orders are sealed USBs and you pull one out and everyone fucking kneels when it gets busted open…

June 17, 2014
some cloud formations…

vortexanomaly:

image

June 16, 2014
—and this is the magic of fragments—the way that poem breaks off leads into a thought that can’t ever be apprehended. There is the space where a thought would be, but which you can’t get hold of. I love that space. It’s the reason I like to deal with fragments. Because no matter what the thought would be if it were fully worked out, it wouldn’t be as good as the suggestion of a thought that the space gives you.

Anne Carson, 2002 Paris Review interview

I MEAN.

(via havingbeenbreathedout)

4:01pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z-dllx1ItupSC
Filed under: anne carson poetry 
June 16, 2014
noraleah:

etsy:

A quilt of many colors: Box of Crayons quilt by Gina Rockenwagner.

That’s just wonderful.

noraleah:

etsy:

A quilt of many colors: Box of Crayons quilt by Gina Rockenwagner.

That’s just wonderful.

12:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z-dllx1Isl0sn
Filed under: fiber arts 
June 6, 2014

contra-band:

relax-play:

China Mieville interviews the fearless Ursula K Le Guin.

She drops so many truth bombs in this. AMAZING.

(via smallbeerpress)

June 6, 2014
nobodyiswatchingus:

Waterfall amidst a mountain covered in ash after a volcano eruption.
Taken in Iceland. One of the most unique landscape photos I’ve ever seen.

nobodyiswatchingus:

Waterfall amidst a mountain covered in ash after a volcano eruption.

Taken in Iceland. One of the most unique landscape photos I’ve ever seen.

(via petermorwood)

June 5, 2014
laughingsquid:

Designer Uses Open-Source NASA Hubble Telescope Images For Her Line Of Fantastically Ethereal Silk Scarves

laughingsquid:

Designer Uses Open-Source NASA Hubble Telescope Images For Her Line Of Fantastically Ethereal Silk Scarves

(via artisticwitchcraft)

June 5, 2014

Because so much of fantasy takes place in settings that in no way resemble the real world, featuring species that in no way resemble human, fantasy writers often have trouble dealing with regular people. This is something that, I think, isn’t as much of a problem for mainstream writers, because they can simply describe the world around them and come up with a reasonably accurate representation of humanity. They can also fall back on the plethora of real-world terms used to describe human beings, racially and otherwise. But using these terms makes no sense if you’re dealing with a world that doesn’t share our political/cultural context. You can’t call someone “African American” if your world has no Africa, no America, and has never gone through a colonial phase in which people of disparate cultures were forcibly brought together, thus necessitating the term in the first place.

That said, it’s equally illogical to populate your fantasy world with only one flavor of human being, which is what far too many fantasy stories default to. Granted, many fantasies take place in confined cultural spaces — a single small kingdom in a Europeanish milieu, maybe a single city or castle within that city. (But how did that castle get its spices for the royal table, or that lady her silks? What enemy are the knights training to fight? Even in the most monochromatic parts of the real Ye Olde Englande, I can guarantee you there were some Asian traders, Sephardic or Ashkenazic Jewish merchants, Spanish diplomats or nobles partly descended from black Moors, and so on.) I get that lots of countries on Earth are racially homogeneous, so it makes perfect sense that some fantasy settings would be too. But whiteness is the default in our thinking for Earth-specific cultural/political reasons. So while it’s logical for fantasy realms to be homogeneous, it’s not logical for so many of them to be homogeneously white. Something besides logic is causing that.

So. It’s a good idea for all fantasy writers to learn how to describe characters of color. And I think it’s a good idea to learn how to describe those characters in subtle ways, since they can’t always rely on Earth terminology. Now, doing subtle description increases the chance that the reader might misidentify the character racially — and to a degree, I think there’s nothing you can do about that. You’re working against a lifetime of baggage in the reader’s mind. But you can still insert enough cues so that when combined, they’ll get the idea across.

— N.K. Jemisin, blogging on Describing Characters of Color for Magic District.  (via audreymgonzalez)

(via medievalpoc)

June 4, 2014

suricattus:

lagilman:

kat-howard:

itscolossal:

Man Spends a Decade Transforming a Hedge into a Massive Dragon

I would be so happy if my neighbor was a hedge dragon.

First person to get a photo of a stray cat sleeping on one of its paws, wins.

hedgewitchery!

(via petermorwood)

June 4, 2014

moshita:

Those beautiful skulls are hand carved and painted with oil on raw, gold-lip and black-lip Philippine mother-of-pearl

Gregory Raymond Halili

(via petermorwood)

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