March 21, 2014
But cities that are magical and sentient tho

toomanystarstocount:

  • Cities shutting down the subway and refusing to lower bridges when potholes get too bad and nothing is done about them because hey that hurts and someone needs to fix it.
  • Cities opening old abandoned subway stations and venting hot air above ground during the winter for the homeless population.

March 21, 2014
The prince fought valiantly.
He slayed the dragon.
The princess cried for days.
She loved that dragon.

— The stories fairytales don’t tell (via caliginosity-)

March 20, 2014
thranduilsenpai:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

chaoticbanter:

beharkei:

Mermaid by Sergey Kolesov

Ok, that’s fucking terrifying and cool.

woah I love this interpretation of mermaids. not human sized, but the size of like a blue whale

That moment you realise the fishermen’s hooks are tearing her flesh.

thranduilsenpai:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

chaoticbanter:

beharkei:

Mermaid by Sergey Kolesov

Ok, that’s fucking terrifying and cool.

woah I love this interpretation of mermaids. not human sized, but the size of like a blue whale

That moment you realise the fishermen’s hooks are tearing her flesh.

(via thanbooksmightmean)

March 20, 2014

(Source: heart-without-art-is-just-he, via theashleyclements)

March 19, 2014

mnhp2014:

Emily Caswell:

Emily’s recent project is a comparison study of the Cornish and Icelandic habitats; comparing the similarities and differences in the landscape, flora and fauna. The first part of her project is being undertaken in Cornwall, with the majority of the work being done in the north coast. Whilst in Cornwall Emily is perfecting her camera techniques before she heads off to Iceland for nine days in March.

When she heads off to explore Iceland, Emily shall be traveling the south coast. Her trip will start in Reykjavik and end at Iceland’s largest glacier, Jökulsárlón. Throughout her travels she shall be photographing the famous waterfalls, volcanoes, glaciers, as well as the variety of wildlife such as whales. Throughout the whole project she shall be portraying the beauty of the two environments, through the use of colour, form and lines within the natural habitats. 

http://emilycaswellphotography.photodeck.com

 

Relevant to my interests.

March 19, 2014
4,000-year-old Dartmoor burial find rewrites British bronze age history

petermorwood:

amadansmound:

"Apart from the basket, this burial had the belt; the ear studs – identical to those on sale in many goth shops – made from spindle wood, a hard fine-grained wood often used for knitting needles, from trees which still grow on the lower slopes of Dartmoor; and the unique arm band, plaited from cowhair and originally studded with 34 tin beads that would have shone like silver. There were even charred scraps of textile that may be the remains of a shroud, and fragments of charcoal from the funeral pyre.

"Although tin – essential for making bronze – from Cornwall and Devon became famous across the ancient world, there was no previous evidence of smelting from such an early date. The necklace, which included amber from the Baltic, had a large tin bead made from part of an ingot beaten flat and then rolled. Although research continues, the archaeologists are convinced it was made locally.

"The cist, a stone box, was first spotted more than a decade ago by a walker on Duchy of Cornwall land, when an end slab collapsed as the peat mound that had sheltered it for 4,000 years was gradually washed away. However, it was only excavated three years ago when archaeologists realised the site was eroding so fast any possible contents would inevitably soon be lost. It was only when they lifted the top slab that the scale of the discovery became apparent. The fur and the basket were a wet blackened sludgy mess, but through it they could see beads and other objects. "As we carefully lifted the bundle a bead fell out – and I knew immediately we had something extraordinary," Marchand said. "Previously we had eight beads from Dartmoor; now we have 200.""

There was a short TV documentary about this find (saved to Sky+ and watched last night) which may be on YouTube by now and is well worth a look. The artefacts are reconstructed by traditional methods - the ear-studs are turned on a pull-string lathe, and even the tin ore for the beads is dug up from Dartmoor and smelted on-side with charcoal and hand-bellows. Fascinating stuff.

March 18, 2014

paintvrlife:

Leonid Afremov is a passionate painter from Mexico who paints with palette knife with oil on canvas. He loves to express the beauty, harmony and spirit of this world in his paintings, which are rich in different moods, colors and emotions.

(via dduane)

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Filed under: art 
March 18, 2014

(Source: razanalsaif)

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Filed under: frites 
March 17, 2014

roundlittleowl asked: So one of my favorite posts of yours is the one about the Roman socks (their poor, cold toes), and it made me curious about the history of knitting (though actually those socks are nalbinding?). Anyway I read an article about it and was specifically intrigued by "There is a fairly obvious trail of artifacts from Egypt to Moorish-occupied Spain, and up into the rest of Europe." I was wondering if you knew of any examples of fiber arts made/imported/etc by POC in the Middle Ages?

medievalpoc:

Yes, and it’s SO interesting!

Surviving trade goods like textiles, beads, and small, portable artworks are actually one of the reasons we know that the Silk Road has been in use pretty much since there have been humans. It’s such a fascinating history, no matter where you start or where you end up!

You can find Egyptian beads in Irish graves, and Persians silks and Chinese beads in Viking funeral ships.

The Silk Road has been in use since about 500 B.C., and the pre-Historic Silk Road trade route was called the Steppe Road.

In the Middle Ages in Europe, one of the most highly prized trade items was cloth from The Middle East and Asia. It was often called “Tatar cloth”, and there are even paintings like this that show Asian traders with these kind of precious goods:

image

[Italy, c. 1350]

The incredible value of this cloth caused a trend in Medieval European art: “Psuedo-Kufic" characters, which were basically imitation Arabic letters, added to painted garments in Medieval European paintings to make the cloth look richer:

image

Tatar Cloth

Tatar People (Brittanica.com)

The Silk Road in Antiquity (the Met Museum)

Commercial Exchange and Diplomacy Between Venice and the Islamic World

A little more about Venice and the Mamluks, the Ottomans, and the Safavids

By the time the cloth got to Italy, it was already expensive. By the time it got to Northwestern Europe, it was nearly priceless.

There’s also the history regarding how both supply and demand for goods from Asia was generated by the massive population movement during the Mongolian invasion of Europe, and how much cultural exchange, especially in the form of fashions, there really was.

Although there was some trade in textiles between African nations and empires during the European medieval period, most of the trade took the form of gold and salt, the most highly prized commodities. The Ghana and Malian Empires exported almost unspeakable amounts of gold. In the days of Mansa Musa, Mali was providing half the entire world’s supply of salt and gold. That’s basically where the money for the European Renaissance came from.

I’m sure you’ve read about or maybe even seen “cloth-of-gold”. Ancient and Medieval textiles always have a fascinating history behind them. This is the story behind this piece of cloth-of-gold:

image

Beginning in 1211, Genghis Khan invaded the Jin Empire, then proceeded across Central Asia to conquer eastern Iran and the territories east of the Oxus River (today Amu Darya) known as Transoxiana. The artisans and master craftsmen from conquered cities were enslaved and distributed among members of the Khan’s family and distinguished generals.

The nomadic Mongols took these artisans, who fashioned luxury items and other highly desirable articles, to cities in Mongolia and eastern Central Asia. Historical accounts and travel narratives of the period mention them, yet little has survived of the objects, particularly the textiles, they produced.

This magnificent cloth of gold is one of the few silk and gold textiles that can be associated with those craftsmen. It is woven with pairs of winged lions within aligned, tangent roundels and pairs of griffins in the interstices. The background is densely filled with scrolling vines and palmettes. Both the overall design and the animals are Persian; yet the cloud-like ornamentation of the lions’ wings, the cloud scrolls at the terminals of the vines filling the background of the roundels, and the dragons’ heads at the ends of the lions’ tails are based on Chinese models.

The synthesis of Eastern and Western elements is purely Central Asian, which is not surprising considering that captive craftsmen from the former Jin territories were working in the same cities as the captured artisans from eastern Persia and Transoxiana. The density of its design and the fact that the design was entirely woven with gold thread are characteristic of textiles produced during the Mongol period.

The artistic and technical quality of this textile is unsurpassed among the silk and gold textiles that have survived from the early Mongol period. Given that it was once preserved in a Tibetan monastery, this textile was probably woven during the middle of the thirteenth century.

The Mongols only began to make contact with Tibet in 1240 and did not sign a treaty until 1247. In honor of that occasion, gold, silver, and two hundred precious robes were given as imperial gifts to Tibetan monasteries. A few years later, starting in 1251, members of Genghis Khan’s family began to patronize different Tibetan sects, which involved presenting gifts that, in those days, always included precious textiles. A textile of the extraordinary quality and value of this cloth of gold would almost certainly have reached Tibet as an imperial gift.

The Cleveland Museum of Art

March 17, 2014
Siken Interview About His New Book

(Source: richardsikendaily)

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Filed under: richard siken 
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