September 28, 2013
New research shows 0.6% of rape allegations are false.

babyslime:

skyliting:

rememberyes:

boldmatter:

jadelyn:

likeadeadchinadoll:

and for those interested, you can find the report HERE

Just in case any dudebros are unclear on what this means: it means that your buddy who totally just had some bitch trying to ruin his life by accusing him of rape…almost certainly actually did rape her.  

Just keep that in mind.

Yeah man, imagine that, bitches don’t be lying.

Can we put this into context? It means that 99.4% of rape allegations are true

It means that 99.4% of rape allegations are true.

When you read through and learn about those 0.6% who did make false allegations, there are some seriously important things to note. Firstly :

"Furthermore, the report shows that a significant number of these cases involved young, often vulnerable people. About half of the cases involved people aged 21 years old and under, and some involved people with mental health difficulties. In some cases, the person alleged to have made the false report had undoubtedly been the victim of some kind of offence (sic), even if not the one which he or she had reported.
And then, when you get into the case studies you find things like a 14 year old girl sleeping with an 18 year old. When discovered, she claimed the sex was non-consensual in fear of her father’s disapproval, but investigation of texts and emails found that to be untrue. THAT SAID, the 18 year old was found to have a history of pursuing and seducing many very young girls, and once he was counseled he expressed not only regret over his actions, but the knowledge that he was purposefully picking vulnerable girls who could be easily manipulated into consent.

Another case was a married couple, where the wife claimed rape and domestic violence, so the husband was arrested and held. After some contact between the two while he was incarcerated, she went back to him and wanted the charges dropped. It’s okay because she still loves him. When the DA decided to keep going, she suddenly said that she made it up and he never raped her at all.
Further counseling revealed that the allegations were true, but she didn’t want to be without him so she lied about the allegations being false.
I don’t know about you, but this kind of sounds like classic domestic violence, and the kind of patterns you get into after living with an abuser.
The point I’m trying to make is that even though there are 0.6% false claims… when you break them down you find that there’s generally a lot of skeevy shit going on, and like the above quote, many of the alleged rape victims are actual victims of other abuses. For some of them, I’m guessing that an allegation of rape was the only way to bring enough attention to their abuse to finally get protection by law enforcement, or enough care from family to be freed from their abusive situations and moved somewhere safe. Some are mentally ill and have been taken advantage of, or are victims of statutory rape because they are not even remotely mature enough to truly consent to a sexual relationship with an adult.
These cases aren’t just as simple as, “some bitch regretted sex and cried rape”.

Betsy, we need to add this study to the responses in Feminist Bingo.

(Source: handsome--gretel)

June 27, 2013
Announcing the release of WendyClock

On June 25, 2013, Texas state senator Wendy Davis waged a talking filibuster to kill SB5, a Republican-backed bill that would close most Texas abortion clinics. As Davis’s filibuster looked more and more likely to succeed, her opponents used increasingly questionable tactics to force a vote before midnight, the end of the special legislative session. At 12:02 AM on June 26, the Texas Senate’s GOP leadership called a vote on the bill, in defiance of the chamber’s own rules, and declared victory. Davis’s supporters, both those in the gallery and the 182,000 who watched on the Texas Tribune’s live feed, used the Senate’s own rules to force the GOP to nullify the invalid vote.

Here’s the timeline of what went down.

The Irregular Gentlewomen are releasing WendyClock, which is an open-source timeline of #standwithwendy. We strongly encourage people to fork the repo and submit pull requests — this is an open beta release! We have done our best to track down citations of the shenanigans, but if you know of other datapoints, please help us organize the information.

We are grateful to Tristan Healy and Megan Sumerell for their help; without them, this release of WendyClock would not be possible.

Reblog ICYMI! Betsy and I made a thing!

(Source: elizabethyalkut)

June 26, 2013
Announcing the release of WendyClock

On June 25, 2013, Texas state senator Wendy Davis waged a talking filibuster to kill SB5, a Republican-backed bill that would close most Texas abortion clinics. As Davis’s filibuster looked more and more likely to succeed, her opponents used increasingly questionable tactics to force a vote before midnight, the end of the special legislative session. At 12:02 AM on June 26, the Texas Senate’s GOP leadership called a vote on the bill, in defiance of the chamber’s own rules, and declared victory. Davis’s supporters, both those in the gallery and the 182,000 who watched on the Texas Tribune's live feed, used the Senate's own rules to force the GOP to nullify the invalid vote.

Here’s the timeline of what went down.

The Irregular Gentlewomen are releasing WendyClock, which is an open-source timeline of #standwithwendy. We strongly encourage people to fork the repo and submit pull requests — this is an open beta release! We have done our best to track down citations of the shenanigans, but if you know of other datapoints, please help us organize the information.

We are grateful to Tristan Healy and Megan Sumerell for their help; without them, this release of WendyClock would not be possible.

June 8, 2013
Announcing the release of Rated R for Rapist

The Irregular Gentlewomen are proud to announce the 1.0 release of Rated R for Rapist! This is an open-source app created to provide information about whether a movie has been made in part by people who have chosen to collaborate with or otherwise support Roman Polanski.

Collaboration, for the purposes of this project, is defined as credited in a production in which Roman Polanski is also credited. Other support can include being a signatory on a petition, making comments on the record in a public forum such as an interview or press conference, or writing an editorial.

A Vague Disclaimer Is Nobody’s Friend

We make no claim to complete accuracy in the results provided by this tool. The information used in determining if a movie has been made in part by Roman Polanski collaborators or supporters is drawn from the following sources:

It is possible, indeed probable, indeed certain, that there are further collaborators and supporters of Polanski’s career and decisions. (We have not gone looking for any of the many op-eds written in 2009 to include the authors thereof, for example.)

In short: Roman Polanski has been working in the film industry, American and European, for decades. He is undeniably a talented filmmaker and therefore enjoys the support of many of his fellow filmmakers. Because we live in a society which excuses, minimizes, and avoids thinking about rape, he has been able to retain that support even though he is an admitted rapist.

We are not interested in debating, discussing, or engaging with the question of whether Polanski’s life, history, and/or talent provide mitigating circumstances; this project operates on the assumptions that (a) drugging and raping a thirteen-year-old is not an excusable action, (b) to attempt to excuse such an action allies one with the rapist rather than the survivor, and (c) to choose not to support, financially or otherwise, the work of a rapist or those who support a rapist is an ethical action. Many people — including both the authors of this project — have independently made such a choice; this tool is meant only to provide information to make it easier to follow through on that choice.

These are our premises; we do not intend to defend or explain them beyond this statement.

February 7, 2013
jcalanthe:

stickingupforsammy:

“If I were to create a ratings system, I wouldn’t even put murder right at the top of the chief offenses. I would put rape right at the top of the chief offenses, and the assault against women. Because it’s so insanely overused and insulting how much it’s overused in movies as a plot device: a woman in peril. That, to me, is offensive. Yet that shit skates.”
 —Kevin Smith, This Film is Not Yet Rated

I have complicated feelings about Kevin Smith, but I adore him because he’ll stand up & say stuff like this. 


Betsy, we gotta whitelist Keven Smith.

jcalanthe:

stickingupforsammy:

“If I were to create a ratings system, I wouldn’t even put murder right at the top of the chief offenses. I would put rape right at the top of the chief offenses, and the assault against women. Because it’s so insanely overused and insulting how much it’s overused in movies as a plot device: a woman in peril. That, to me, is offensive. Yet that shit skates.”

—Kevin Smith, This Film is Not Yet Rated

I have complicated feelings about Kevin Smith, but I adore him because he’ll stand up & say stuff like this. 

Betsy, we gotta whitelist Keven Smith.

(via sailaweigh)

January 9, 2013

Willow: Remember, if you hurt her, I will beat you to death with a shovel.
(Riley looks blank. Scared? Constipated? We’ll never know.)
Willow: A vague disclaimer is nobody’s friend. Have fun! (She smiles brightly and pats Riley on the shoulder.)

(Source: jaclynnicolee, via trelkez)

January 4, 2013
Note to self

After the current soul-destroying Irregular Gentlewomen project is done, maybe do something a little cheerier. Like, oh, data-vis for the Offbeat Empire reader survey. For example.

October 16, 2012
This is a love letter.

Ada Lovelace Day is about sharing stories of women — whether engineers, scientists, technologists or mathematicians — who have inspired you to become who you are today. The aim is to create new role models for girls and women in these male-dominated fields by raising the profile of other women in STEM. Finding Ada

This is a love letter to a woman I met almost exactly a year ago today. This is a love letter to a woman who has taught me, learned from me, laughed at and with me, told me stories, emailed me pictures of kittens on days when I desperately needed them, lent me books, poured me cocktails at three in the afternoon, dozed off on my shoulder, coded with me, argued with me, told me when I was wrong, listened to me when I told her she was wrong. This is a love letter to Betsy Haibel.

Betsy and I have known each other casually for a while — we were both involved with the Organization for Transformative Works a few years ago, and when I moved to DC last year, I think I was talking to her on Twitter about neighborhoods and getting coffee together and lord only knows — when I went over to her apartment, a few weeks after I moved, I was honestly expecting nothing more than a slice of pumpkin-yogurt cake and a few hours of chatting about Doctor Who and Slings and Arrows and how criminal it is that we live in a world without dragons. I ended up with a feminist open-source code collective, an addiction to Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan series, at least one novel, and someone without whom I don’t know how I would have coped with the past year of my life.

Betsy is a backend coder — she mostly works in Rails — and she has never, ever, not once, rolled her eyes at me for asking questions about backend *~magic~*. She has walked me through code in coffeeshops, suggested solutions to my git problems (death to merge conflicts, death death death), thanked me for correcting her prejudices about grid systems, asked me about z-index bugs, and clapped her hands excitedly when I figured out the weird “can’t-be-a-clearfix-bug”. She reminds me of the best parts of my job, of my industry, and reassures me that the bad parts can get better, can be survived and overcome.

I am grateful to have Betsy in my life; I am grateful she is my friend; I am grateful to work with her; I am grateful to learn from her, and this is why I am writing her a love letter for Ada Lovelace Day.

October 1, 2012
Girl logic

ungemmed:

theotherchaos:

kaidanalenko:

youbigstupidjellyfish:

shalebridge:

biffrobertson:

he gets mad, yells, and treats me like shit.  I should probably date him. He treats me with respect, is nice, and will do anything for me. Friend zone.

u forgot ur fedora

did u trim ur neckbeard today

here’s yr copy of Atlas Shrugged

i’m so proud of all these reblog comments <3

Emily’s Candy = the official font of the revolution

What Betsy said.

(Source: rowboatfco)

September 15, 2012
Announcing the release of the Interactive Feminist Bingo Card

The Irregular Gentlewomen are proud to release version 1.0 of the Interactive Feminist Bingo Card! An open-source project (CC BY-NC-SA), the Interactive Feminist Bingo Card is meant to be an easy way for commenters in online feminist venues to identify sexist and misogynistic trolls, provide validation of a commenter’s judgement that a troll is genuinely trolling and not just clueless, and suggest responses to some of the remarks the troll has made.

Bingo cards are common in the geek feminist community; there are several existing ones linked in the Geek Feminism wiki, and Betsy & I relied on them heavily while creating the bingo card. We’ve both used those existing cards when participating in or reading passionate exchanges in feminist spaces, and felt the need for a card which collated the contents of many of the existing cards and made the game aspect of the card more true to life. (We’re not aware of any other interactive bingo cards in the social justice blogosphere; the cards we have encountered have all been either table-based or images, many of the latter very pretty.)

There are dozens of different squares in the many existing cards, which sometimes made it frustrating to play using one card — “That comment should get me bingo, but it’s not on the card!”

The color scheme is the “girly girl" palette from earlgrey at colorlovers, and the fonts are Emily’s Candy and Miss Fajardose; the names were a part of our decision-making process. We rejected at least one font because the name included a masculine reference. This bingo card is, in part, about embracing the female and the feminine and the feminist and not being ashamed of those things — so we looked for color schemes tagged “girly,” with lots of pink in them, we filtered through the display fonts at Google Fonts to find ones with girls’ names and curlicues and hearts over the i’s. But pink and swirly and all of those quote-unquote traditionally feminine qualities aren’t the only way of being feminine, much less being female, and certainly not the only way of being feminist (in fact, it can be argued that embracing the girly and feminine is a very specific kind of feminism, very third-wave feminism, which isn’t always accepted as feminism). We wanted to make sure to include some iconic feminist references, which is why, upon clicking a square, the text transforms into white-on-red with a black-and-white background — it’s meant to evoke the Barbara Kruger (your body is a battleground) photograph, which was designed as a poster for the massive pro-choice march that took place on April 9, 1989 in Washington, D.C. I would have loved to make that reference more explicit by using the actual face in the Kruger, or treating a stock image similarly, but we were concerned about copyright issues. Hence, the classic “female” symbol is the background of the “used” squares. (Yeah, we probably could have gotten away with a fair use argument, but that was just not the hill we wanted to die on.)

The animation is there for a few reasons: one, because this project was partially a lab space for us to push the boundaries of our code knowledge, and I haven’t gotten a chance to mess around with CSS animations and transitions and whatnot at work much; two, because animation on a web site, unless very discreet, is the kind of stuff that gets disparaged as the realm of amateurs*, the kind of thing you would have seen on a Geocities site, the sort of visual flourish which would only appeal to (and imagine this said in a tone of deep contempt) girls. Obviously, we regard this as bullshit. Animation is a key part of a lot of things that are not seen as girly — where, for example, would video games be without animation? So we wanted to juxtapose the very femininely-styled text, in a feminist context, against the kind of powerful effects which are either sneered at as unsubtle when it’s in a context coded as female or lauded as creative and daring when in a context coded as male. How well we succeeded, well, that’s for the audience to decide. The code is available on github, after all, and if you hate the animations, you can fork it and strip the CSS.

(Also, I really like the zoomy effect. VROOM VROOM FEMINISM.)

In general, we strongly encourage people to fork the project! One of our design goals was ensuring that the content-source files, particularly, would be easy to edit — hopefully, even easy to edit for the less technical. We hope that other people will add to our list of trollish comments & rebuttals, and perhaps even that our code can provide an engine for other anti-oppression bingo cards. (While we’d love to see, for example, anti-racist or anti-cissexist bingo cards, we felt that as white cis women from privileged economic backgrounds we would not be the right people to make them.)

Good luck never getting bingo, and if you have to, we hope the kitten video (oh, did we mention that if you win, you get a kitten video? Thanks to Skud and Emily for that idea.) helps balm your soul.

* See, for example, Vitaly Friedman’s article, in which he remarks, “designers of CSS-based websites tend to avoid extreme interactivity and instead use subtle, refined effects sparingly”. And yet Anthony Calzadilla's Spiderman animation, later linked in Friedman’s Smashing Magazine as an example of CSS3 animation, is about as in-your-face as it can get.

This post has been featured on Geek Feminism. The Interactive Feminist Bingo Card was linked to by BUST magazine.

Known forks include Kaiser Health News’s Debate-O.

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